THE AFROHEMIAN NOMAD™
Hippie vibes and nomadic tendencies. I dream in Africa, and blog about those dreams. To find out more about the True African Original movement check out http://www.trueafricanoriginal.com/


Pictures belong to respective owners unless otherwise stated and copyright infringement is not intended.
THE AFROHEMIAN NOMAD™
+
|Khat| According to some sources #khat was first grown in Ethiopia. However, amongst communities in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, khat-chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years.
+
"War does not determine who is right - only who is left."
Bertrand Russell (via thatlitsite)
+
ripening-under-the-sun:

rom com.
+
mpdrolet:

Andrew Dosunmu
+
nappysupastar:

herabstract:

piecesofablackman:

Black is you.
Black is me.
Black is us.
Black is free.

My Boys.

My people!!!
+
+
p-achao:

a—fri—ca:

Amina by Marta Bevacqua on Flickr
+
allbeautifulblackgirls:

Ajak Deng
allbeautifulblackgirls:

Ajak Deng
allbeautifulblackgirls:

Ajak Deng
+
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
+
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
ikirejones:

Ikiré Jones SS ‘14 Pocket Squares.




The Untold Renaissance. This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered. - www.ikirejones.com
+
grell21love:

gotta a lot of these…
grell21love:

gotta a lot of these…
grell21love:

gotta a lot of these…
grell21love:

gotta a lot of these…
+
"There are poems
inside of you
that paper can’t
handle."
(via forebidden)
+
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
dynamicafrica:

In photos: “Turkana” by Jehad Nga.
A photographer of Libyan descent born in the United States and raised between Tripoli, Libya and London, England, Jehad Nga's lens has explored many stories and identities all over the African continent. From photographing a beauty contest in Botswana for HIV affected to women, night commuters in Ugandan, and the Liberian civil war, to illegal migration in to South Africa and documenting his own country, Libya, Nga's body of work is unique in that it contains projects that cover all regions of the African continent.
In this 2010 series titled ‘Turkana’, Nga’s photographs highlight the people of the Turkana region of Kenya - perhaps the area worst hit by drought in the country. Despite oil and water reserves in Turkana, the people reap few of the benefits as the government and large corporations take control of these resources.
According to Nga, the Turkana are ‘dwindling in numbers’ due to drought and subsequent neglect from them Kenyan government. Devastatingly, as a result of food and water shortages and with little to no aid reaching them, for some of the people photographed by Nga, these are the very last images of them. Shortly after photographing them, several of the individuals photographed passed away as a result of starvation caused by drought.
With the darkness filling up the negative space in the photographs, the significance of this sombre effect is to show the disappearing of a people. Nga’s aim, through these photographs, is to highlight the neglected plight of the people of the Turkana region and create a consciousness and awareness concerning their situation. 
Website | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | YouTube | Soundcloud | Mixcloud
All Africa, All the time.
+
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Julia Noni Captures Kenya’s Elite Runners in Nairobi For Nike.
Ready on view at the solo exhibition “Run The Way You Were Meant To” in China at Nike’s new X158 concept store in Shanghai.
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
+