THE AFROHEMIAN NOMAD™
Hippie vibes and nomadic tendencies. I dream in Africa, and blog about those dreams. To find out more about the True African Original movement check out http://www.trueafricanoriginal.com/


Pictures belong to respective owners unless otherwise stated and copyright infringement is not intended.
THE AFROHEMIAN NOMAD™
+
ripening-under-the-sun:

narrative.
theotherblack:

An Oversimplification of Her Beauty I want to see this. Have to support indie black films right? And it was at Sundance. Anyone see it? Is it good? Any tea on it? Huh? Huh? huh?
+
mererecorder:

CULTURE by grohsARTig
+
+
cschoonover:

Giannina
By cschoonover Styling: generallynecessary
+
"Those who don’t believe in magic will never find it."
Roald Dahl (via panatmansam)
+
taeyang1:

African wrap, simply gorgeous
+
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
africanartagenda:

Eria Sane Nsubuga
Country: Uganda
Style: Expressionist/ Semi-Abstract
Medium:
Fun Fact:
Quote:
Well, I think people should do what they want to do – what they really want to do. What has happened in Uganda is that we feel helpless, we are afraid. You censor yourself. Self-censorship – that’s the first thing. Second thing – if you don’t censor yourself then the galleries will censor you, because they also need money and they can’t risk being hunted down or something. Most Galleries often want to show everything apart from the real issues and for me that’s frustrating. The artists here are afraid, so they use a lot of symbolic in their work. I used to do that as well, but in the end I thought that it wasn’t direct enough, which was finally confirmed to me recently. A lot of my work is getting more direct, because I talk about some personalities in the paintings.
Paintings
1. Arrogance
2. Christ at Golgotha
3. Taxi moment (Life in public transportation)
4.
5.
6.The Modern Bride (of Chucky)
7. Mind of His Own


More at http://artwasane.blogspot.com/
+
cre8tivesilence:

by Ruven Afanado
+
nowaves:

Photo by:http://pournoirr.tumblr.com/
+
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.
This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.
Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.
Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.
In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.
And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.
Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.
13 June – 25 August 2014Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30) Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)Terrace Rooms, South WingFree admission
More events.
+
+
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
awkwardsituationist:

twenty four year old natasha lives with her two children on a small plot of land in rural burkina faso, which she uses to cultivate millet. a staple of their diet, the millet is not nutritionally dense, which leads to malnutrition, and often runs out before the next harvest. this forces natasha, with her youngest in tow, to scavenge for firewood and walk it to the nearest town a dozen miles away, where she then sells it and buys a little extra food and medicine.
although women in burkina faso provide more than half of the nation’s agricultural labour, they own less than a fifth of the land. women are viewed less as “owners of land” and more as “owners of crops”, and customary rural laws, which tend to trump any written legal protection, mean their land can be arbitrarily taken away. marriage offers some protection, but natasha has not heard from her husband since he left to find work in senegal over a year ago, and a dissolution of the marriage would mean certain land forfeiture. 
despite women in the country being more productive with their land than men, they are further marginalized by banking restrictions; since women are not considered landowners, they are unable to provide the collateral needed to secure a loan, and are consequently forced to accept extremely high interest rates which further trap them in poverty.
these photos are from jessica dimmock’s “a mother’s devotion,” done in collaboration with médecins sans frontières for the documentary project, starved for attention, which attempts to reframe the issue of global malnutrition away from the cliched images of helpless victim.
+
facesandphotography:

Name: Maguette
Nationality: Senegalese/Cameroonian
Photography in one word: Reality
Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2014
daniosorio.com | Facebook page
+
cschoonover:

Chris Schoonover
Model: gianninaoteto  Styling: generallynecessary
+
crystallizations:

Photograph from the Insectes series by Laurent Seroussi.